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New York : Riverhead Books, 2005.
395 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
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Includes index.
1573222976 (alk. paper)
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332.024 Orman
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Author Notes
Suze Orman was born in Chicago, Illinois on June 5, 1951. She received a B.A. in social work from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1976. Before starting her own financial planning firm, she was an account executive at Merrill Lynch and a vice-president of investments for Prudential-Bache Securities. She is a columnist for Self magazine, a contributing editor to O: The Oprah Magazine, and hosts The Suze Orman Show. <p> She has written several financial books including You've Earned It, Don't Lose It: Mistakes You Can't Afford to Make When You Retire; The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom: Practical and Spiritual Steps So You Can Stop Worrying; Women and Money: Owning the Power to Control Your Destiny; and The Money Class: How to Stand in Your Truth and Create the Future You Deserve. She received the National Equality Award from the Human Rights Campaign and the Amelia Earhart Award for her message of financial empowerment for women in 2008. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)
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Trade Reviews

  Library Journal Review

From an expert: money basics for beginners. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Publishers Weekly Review

With more than 6.5 million books in print (nearly three million of The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom alone), an eponymous CNBC show, contributing editorships at O: The Oprah Magazine and Costco Magazine and a biweekly Yahoo! column, Orman commands a great deal of economic bandwidth. This seventh book will be released with a PBS special (her fourth) pitched specifically to 20- and 30-somethings early in their working lives, who are, to put it nicely, having trouble negotiating a challenging economy: "Our starting point is that you are broke, by your or any definition." In the bright, clipped, supportive-but-not-mushy affirmative diction that dominates motivational business titles, Orman lays out a plan for maximizing the little that one has, focusing on ways to raise one's FICO score as a means of making more choices available. ("FICO" stands for the mysterious Fair Isaac Corporation-with whom Orman has an arrangement for her own FICOkit.) She runs through a plethora of money problems and what to do about them: credit card debt, student loans, mortgages (and advice on real estate), car payments, taxes, IRAs-almost anything one can think of that has to do with financial planning that can seem bewildering when presented by a salesperson, a direct mail solicitation or HR orientation. With its combination of specific solutions and deep knowledge of its target demographic's specific problems, this book positions itself perfectly and will see correspondingly strong sales among its coveted 18-34s. Agent, Amanda Urban at ICM. (Mar. 1) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

  Kirkus Review

Suze is back, this time with a message for a younger crowd--a wise move for a for a personal-finance whiz who knows the ins and outs of money management. People in their 20s, though they certainly can rack up just as much debt as anyone, have not been Suze's traditional targets with her other recent works, The Laws of Money, The Road to Wealth, The Nine Steps to Financial Freedom. Here, the intended audience is clear: twentysomethings who need sage financial advice. Regarding housing, the author suggests considering a roommate; when it comes to employment, she directs the discussion at those still floating in the career choice ether. When she arrives at her discussion of savings accounts, she declares the book "a spread-sheet free zone." Although the tone is not a bit patronizing, she offers plenty of basic instruction--she negotiates the tricky terrain of financing a mortgage, but also provides the handy reminder to flush the toilets when doing a walk-through of a possible new home. As usual with Suze, the material is highly accessible and practically arranged. The section on combining financial lives with a new long-term partner should be required reading at the marriage license counter. Good stuff for a new audience from the name-brand in personal finance. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
<p> Be sure to catch Suze Orman's latest PBS special based on The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke, which will air the weekend of March 4th on stations across the country. Check your local listings for airtimes. </p> <p> The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous & Broke is financial expert Suze Orman's answer to a generation's cry for help. They're called "Generation Debt" and "Generation Broke" by the media -- people in their twenties and thirties who graduate college with a mountain of student loan debt and are stuck with one of the weakest job markets in recent history. The goals of their parents' generation -- buy a house, support a family, send kids to college, retire in style -- seem absurdly, depressingly out of reach. They live off their credit cards, may or may not have health insurance, and come up so far short at the end of the month that the idea of saving money is a joke. This generation has it tough, without a doubt, but they're also painfully aware of the urgent need to take matters into their own hands.</p> <p> The Money Book was written to address the specific financial reality that faces young people today and offers a set of real, not impossible solutions to the problems at hand and the problems ahead. Concisely, pragmatically, and without a whiff of condescension, Suze Orman tells her young, fabulous & broke readers precisely what actions to take and why. Throughout these pages, there are icons that direct readers to a special YF&B domain on Suze's website that offers more specialized information, forms, and interactive tools that further customize the information in the book. Her advice at times bucks conventional wisdom (did she just say use your credit card?) and may even seem counter-intuitive (pay into a retirement fund even though your credit card debt is killing you?), but it's her honesty, understanding, and uncanny ability to anticipate the needs of her readers that has made her the most trusted financial expert of her day.</p> <p>Over the course of ten chapters that can be consulted methodically, step-by-step or on a strictly need-to-know basis, Suze takes the reader past broke to a secure place where they'll never have to worry about revisiting broke again. And she begins the journey with a bit of overwhelmingly good news (yes, there really is good news): Young people have the greatest asset of all on their side -- time.</p>
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